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Archive 2012 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)
  
 
PhotoDes
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)


I should say southwest USA, and I should probably say "attempts" since I am still trying to settle on my B&W techniques.

The first is the Ventana arch in New Mexico.







The second is from the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Park. The conical rock formations are unique to only 2 places I'm told -- central New Mexico and Turkey. There are some nice slot canyons in the park also.







Comments would be helpful and welcome. (I'll invite Klaus to post some shots from these areas, since I believe they're in his backyard too).

edit: I added a photo from Tent Rocks that shows the rock banding where very uniform layering of volcanic material followed by centuries of erosion created interesting patterns in the rock.







Des

Edited on Jan 13, 2012 at 06:29 PM · View previous versions



Jan 12, 2012 at 03:08 AM
Klaus Priebe
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)


Des,
I like both of these and its been a while since I have been to tent rocks. The day I was there it was bright sun and didn't make for very good shooting. Have yet to go to the arch. Perhaps this spring.
I really like the second shot here with the leaning tree gripping onto the slope of the wash. Definately captures the tenacity of life.



Jan 12, 2012 at 04:11 PM
Charlie Shugart
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)


Des- It's interesting how different people view the same thing and yet have entirely different reactions. While studying the second image, I decided that the tree (although interesting), was blocking my view of the fantastic wall of rock that I assumed was the subject of the photograph. Then I read Klaus's words. Hmmm. Like opinions everywhere, there is seldom a right or wrong. The only opinion that is of ultimate importance here is yours.
About tent rocks- I've traveled extensively through much of the southwest US (not so much in New Mexico, though), and have never seen that kind of erosion. Lots of hoodoos and capped rocks- but no tents like these.
About the first image- it may not have been physically possible, but getting close enough to see sky THROUGH the arch would really show the uniqueness of the amazing erosion that gives us arches and natural bridges.
About everything else- excellent work on your part. I like the compositions and the PP looks very good to me.
Charlie



Jan 12, 2012 at 04:55 PM
 

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denovo2k1
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)


Looks like it was tough light conditions. I like the processing for the rocks in the first shot, but the sky to tree difference is too much..I think shadows are to be more expected so it is critical to get the sky well exposed. For the second shot, I like it, but see what Charlie is saying and I really like the tree. As with many shots when you get home...I can see how a slightly different POV could have made that shot jjust that much better if you were say 8' to the right and back about 5'.
This is typical for me cause I throw out thousands of shots just for these same reasons...maybe HDR would have helped on #1.
Thanks for sharing and hope this helps!



Jan 12, 2012 at 05:09 PM
PhotoDes
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)


Wonderful comments from all -- very helpful. I have concluded that landscape photography is actually quite difficult (and not really my thing). I tend to shoot for the features in the scene and not think enough about POV. The first image was tough -- the arch was backlit and the sky was bright with no distinct clouds. The best I could come up with, after waiting, was a bit of glow on the rocks as seen through the arch. I could do with a little more patience and should have bracketed the exposure and moved around more.

At Tent Rocks, I have many pictures of the rock formations and some very interesting surfaces, and also in the slot canyon, but the tree was the thing I was after in the shot I posted -- not much room to negotiate a shooting position. For those who can go there, it's about half-way between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, just a few miles off the interstate and (now) accessible on good roads. The park itself can be a problem during the late-summer monsoon season because of powerful water running through the canyon -- but the light is fantastic when the clouds have built up over the area.

Thanks again.
Des



Jan 12, 2012 at 09:04 PM
Klaus Priebe
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Southwest landscapes (added photo)


PhotoDes wrote:
Wonderful comments from all -- very helpful. I have concluded that landscape photography is actually quite difficult (and not really my thing). I tend to shoot for the features in the scene and not think enough about POV. The first image was tough -- the arch was backlit and the sky was bright with no distinct clouds. The best I could come up with, after waiting, was a bit of glow on the rocks as seen through the arch. I could do with a little more patience and should have bracketed the exposure and moved around more.

At Tent Rocks, I
...Show more


Des,
You are definately on the right track to landscapes. Your pictures are very nice so don't give up the ship. Its a learning experience just like any other type of photography.
I have found by scouting out locations first and getting a better idea when the light will be right for that particular subject I put it on a list and go from there.
If I see that the light and conditions are looking good for an image I want to shoot then I head over there and give it a shot. Usually I check the night before and then make plans on what and where and hope for the best.
There is never any guarentees though. Plenty of times I have went to a location to shoot and the scene never developed. DOOOOHHHH.
Thats the way it goes though.
But you keep on trying and eventually you will percevere and catch what you are looking to get.
Thats the tough part of landscapes. You have to be at the right place at the right time.
Anyway enough rambling. Its just fun to get out and shoot the outdoors. Its freedom for the soul.



Jan 14, 2012 at 06:36 PM





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