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Archive 2011 · Two step reduction and sharpening technique for web only
  
 
chupacabra31
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p.1 #1 · Two step reduction and sharpening technique for web only


Hello,

I ran into a pro once who introduced me to a two step resizing/sharpening technique (for the web only). He would first take the file from its native res to say 2048 on the long end and then apply between 150-200% sharpening with the smart sharpen filter along with a 0.3-0.4 radius (no threshold adjustment). Then he would reduce the size to 1024 (half of the previous resolution) and apply between 75-125% sharpening with the smart sharpen filter in Photoshop with between 0.1-0.2 radius.

I guess I have always thought if it was good enough for a widely published pro then there must be something to it. Now I find myself questioning it. Why not just take the native file down to 1024 on the long end and apply enough sharpening based on what I need or see.

Thanks in advance!



Dec 23, 2011 at 04:56 PM
redcrown
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p.1 #2 · Two step reduction and sharpening technique for web only


The two step method originated years ago before Photoshop added the Bicubic Sharpener (and other options). It seems it still gets promoted by some "pros" who have not caught up with the times.

I've seen seveal refrences since that indicate it's no longer worth the effort. Do both in a test and see for yourself.



Dec 23, 2011 at 06:32 PM
James_N
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p.1 #3 · Two step reduction and sharpening technique for web only


Yep, the two step method was popularized before Adobe refined the Bicubic Interpolation routines in Photoshop. Similarly popular was the Stair interpolation method for enlarging photos where the size was increased in 10% increments. But since Photoshop CS - when Bicubic Sharper and Smoother were introduced - these methods are more or less obsolete.

Also, the introduction of Camera Raw with its simplified edge sharpening and masking algorithms and the ability to process rendered files (JPEG, TIFF, PSD) in ACR made these methods less popular.



Dec 23, 2011 at 06:51 PM
chupacabra31
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p.1 #4 · Two step reduction and sharpening technique for web only


Thanks so much James and Redcrown for clearing that up for me!


Dec 23, 2011 at 07:19 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #5 · Two step reduction and sharpening technique for web only


If you make yourself a "test pattern" of black & white blocks & grids, you can readily see what is happening when you do your two step sharpening.

I typically use a two step sharpening ... but usually in conjunction with varying degrees of threshold and/or hiraloam. Having spent some time playing with the test patterns, I got a decent feel for achieveing what I wanted to achieve.

A lot of it depends on the type of detail that is in the scene as to how to approach the two step routine. If you are looking for a universal/global approach ... then the two step probably doesn't yield as great a purpose.



Dec 23, 2011 at 08:22 PM





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