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Archive 2011 · What light setup to recreate this shot?
  
 
Leesure
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p.1 #1 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


I'm a amateur starting out with my first job and need help buying my first light kit. These shots will be taken at customers store or warehouse and power is easily available. This shot was taken inside store next to a window. Customer did not have a problem withe color change from the window light on the right to the hot light on the left from the store lighting. The customer did like the shading form the window and overall exposure. Obviously this window light will not always be available when the customer needs the shoots taken. How much light and what type will I need to consistonly light upholstered furniture this way. Will I need strobes, more flash unite, hot or cold continuos, soft boxes, umbrellas. Please help me with the first critical purchase. The budget is 2000.00

I Own
5d mark II
580ex II
420 ex
85 1.2 II
24-105 is
16-35 2.8 II
70-200 2.8 is

thank you




  Canon EOS 5D Mark II    EF85mm f/1.2L II USM lens    85mm    f/3.2    1/80s    400 ISO    0.0 EV  




Dec 06, 2011 at 06:57 PM
Bruce Sawle
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p.1 #2 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


This could be done with one light shot through an umbrella right of the sofa.


Dec 06, 2011 at 07:09 PM
Mark_L
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p.1 #3 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


Your 580exII with an umbrella would do this no problem, you might need your other flash though another umbrella as fill though.

If you are ok using higher iso or can use wider apertures a speedlight would do the job ok but if you are looking to invest I'd go for a PCB einstein with 64" silver plm and white diffuser fabric. This will get you more power and a larger modifier with colour consistency.

Edited on Dec 06, 2011 at 08:14 PM · View previous versions



Dec 06, 2011 at 08:13 PM
cgardner
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p.1 #4 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


Suggest before buying any gear you experiment with what you have with the furniture in your house and find what strategy works best. That's better than just throwing equipment at a problem you don't yet know how to solve.

The three basic ingredients you'd want for a shot of a sofa are:

1) Even frontal fill to reveal the shadow detail (especially important on dark furniture to capture the full range)
2) Downward directional key lighting to model the 3D shape in the front facing the camera
3) Back rim lighting to outline the overall shape and create separation with the background.

Given the size of the objects keeping the lights centered and creating the modeling with the downward angle of the key light would be the simplest strategy. You could do 1 & 2 with a single centered light bounced off the ceiling or split forward / bounced with a diffuser and a second flash behind to create the rim lighting, but would have more control over the lighting with three separate lights.




Dec 06, 2011 at 08:14 PM
BrianO
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p.1 #5 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


"What light setup to recreate this shot?"

If you have the space -- and you should be able to get the space in a warehouse by moving a few things around -- you can recreate the look by building a wood frame the size of the window and stretching sheer white fabric across it. Put the "scrim," as they are called, a few feet from the set, and place a strobe a few feet from the scrim. The strobe will light the scrim, and the scrim will light the set.

Since the light from the scrim will cast a "window-light" pattern on the set, you then need only set another light near the camera to act as a fill light to adjust the highlight/shadow ratios.

A $2,000 budget will be enough to get two moderately-priced strobes, two light stands, two soft boxes, etc.

Before spending one penny of that money, though, get this:

http://www.amazon.com/Light-Science-Magic-Fourth-Introduction/dp/0240812255/



Dec 06, 2011 at 09:59 PM
sspellman
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p.1 #6 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


For the studio photos of large furniture I would buy three studio strobes such as 3 Alien Bee AB800 and 2 large 10 by 12 diffusion screens for even soft light. Matthews and Rose Brand make large diffusion screens and fabrics.


Dec 07, 2011 at 08:38 AM
 

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onetrack
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p.1 #7 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


Looks like you just need a large window.

Strobes will work. I'd just bounce them off of white walls if you want soft light.



Dec 07, 2011 at 01:36 PM
eSchwab
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p.1 #8 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


onetrack wrote:
Looks like you just need a large window.

Strobes will work. I'd just bounce them off of white walls if you want soft light.


Yeah that shot looks like window light. Very large softbox with some fill from a large white board will come close.



Dec 07, 2011 at 06:38 PM
BrianO
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p.1 #9 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


One thing to be aware of when shooting something as long as a sofa with side light is fall-off. If the light source is too close to the sofa, one side of the sofa will be very bright and the other very dark.

Moving the light further off axis will even out the extremes, but most readily-available soft boxes are too small to give the window-light look when moved that far back.

That's why using a large scrim works so well; either a home-made one as I suggested, or a ready made version as sspellman suggested. A "very large" softbox as eSchwab suggested can also work, but they're harder to find, and probably won't work well with just a Speedlite inside, so getting a monolight or pack-and-head strobe would be the way to go.

Fall-off isn't as much of an issue when shooting portraits, because the dimensions of a person's body -- whether front-to-back or side-to-side -- are small, but when lighting large products like furniture or vehicles it's something to be aware of.



Dec 07, 2011 at 08:23 PM
BrianO
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p.1 #10 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


Leesure, I forgot to ask: is this going to be an on-going project, or a one-time job? If it's just once you could get more bang for your buck by renting some good equipment rather than buying lesser gear for the same money.

Since you're in Bellingham, either Vancouver or Seattle have rental agencies for what you would need.

Also, there may be a photography program at Western, and you might be able to get some good ideas by talking to students or faculty, and/or visiting the library.



Dec 07, 2011 at 08:29 PM
Leesure
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p.1 #11 · What light setup to recreate this shot?


Wow! Thank you so much! All your suggestion have inspired me to further my knowledge. I finally decided on Mark_L suggestion and have pulled the trigger on 4 PCB einstein's & a bunch of PLM's. I can't wait to start shaping light!


Dec 20, 2011 at 02:32 AM





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