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Archive 2011 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?
  
 
igmolinav
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p.1 #1 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Hi,

I am interested in the following stand that nicely folds to 19 inches or 48.3 cm.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/612771-REG/Manfrotto_5001B_5001B_Nano_Black_Light.html

It's weight is very attractive too, 2 lbs., or .93 Kg. It's maximum height is 6.2',
or 1.9 m. The only problem I find is that it will only take a maximum load of
3.3 lbs., or 1.5 Kg. Is there a way to make a stand like this one to hold more
weight? I have heard of people placing a sandbag. What would your suggestion
be if one places a head that can weigh between 3.2 lbs. and 5.1 lbs., (or 1.45 Kg.
and 2.3 Kg.), plus a softbox with a light modifier. The amount to be supported
can go up to 6.6 lbs. or 3.0 Kg.

Thank you, kind regards,

igmolinav : ) !!!



Nov 23, 2011 at 01:24 PM
igmolinav
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p.1 #2 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


P.S. Sorry, I forgot to mention that I realize that by doing this I am placing double the weight a stand may support. I wonder if it is adequate at all. The great thing about these stands is that they are very light to travel or move with. If a sandbag or something similar is enough to keep them aground that is great. One could, if helpful, fill in any plastic bag with sand to solve the problem. This doubt about getting them or not, is grounded on the fact that I would be using them at heights between 6.1' and 6.2', (1.7 m. and 1.9 m.), what lies in the maximum height range. I don't want the lamp heads to crash to the ground.


Nov 23, 2011 at 01:32 PM
onetrack
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p.1 #3 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Go to B&H and search their stands. They have filters to narrow your search.

The stand you linked is a good one but only for speed lights and small monolights with reflectors (at least outdoors). It's not really made to handle sand bags. If you're going to be carrying sand bags around, just get a better stand to start with.

6'2" is not very high. I'd go to at least 8'.

Scott



Nov 23, 2011 at 01:44 PM
igmolinav
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p.1 #4 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Hi Scott,

Thank you for your message : ) !!!

As you mention, the idea is to use them outside or for work on the go.
I am just looking for something that can be well compacted and with-
stand some 6.8 lbs. or 3.2 kg.

Kind regards,

igmolinav : ) !!!



Nov 23, 2011 at 02:03 PM
dmacmillan
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p.1 #5 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Scott is right. Weight limitation isn't just about blowing over, but also about the structural strength of the stand and the locking mechanism. I wouldn't want to put an expensive flash or flash head on a stand not rated to carry it.

A stand that short is of little use. To get the correct lighting angle, follow Scott's advice and get at least 8'. I also have a couple of 10' stands.



Nov 23, 2011 at 02:04 PM
igmolinav
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p.1 #6 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Hi,

I found this one, better in many ways than the other one:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/691002-REG/Matthews_B387489_MERF_Mini_Extendable_Reverse.html

It is about two inches, or five centimiters longer than
the other one, but it can withstand up to 9 lbs.,
or 4 Kg. the maximum length is 89" or 227 cm.

I'll keep on looking for other alternatives.

Kind regards,

igmolinav : ) !!!



Nov 23, 2011 at 02:21 PM
Roland W
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p.1 #7 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


One stand that might work out for you is the "Matthews Reverse Stand". I find it is has a good load capacity at 11 pounds and still stores reasonably well at 23 inches. The stand is generally built very well compared to a lot of small stands, and the legs can be set almost flat with the ground to allow the use of sandbags out on the legs. Load ratings are not really standarized, but I agree with the Matthews rating, and would recomend that you get this or something else with a similar rating to support the load you described.

The only limitations worth mentioning are that its maximum height is 7 feet, and that its legs are bar shaped so that they could sink in to soft sand. My solution for the height issue is that I got some extensions for the option of more height, which still keeps the stored length of the combination short for air travel. The "Matthews Telescopic Baby Stand Extension" is an example of such an extension, which is a very strong extension, but is a little on the heavy side. For the sinking in, it is rarely an issue, but I have fastened on some heavy duty round rubber feet on each side of the tip of the leg with a thruogh bolt, which acts like a pad for flat floors, and also makes the tip of the leg not sink in as easily.

My main use of these stands is for Profoto Acute B portable strobes, and I usually hang the power pack from the stand with a strap hooked over the lowest tighning knob, which gives me some weight like a sandbag to help with wind, or with a slightly off center load if I am using a small soft box on the head.

Edited on Nov 23, 2011 at 02:54 PM · View previous versions



Nov 23, 2011 at 02:53 PM
cgardner
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p.1 #8 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Flattering natural looking lighting with flash is pretty simple, you just need to place the key light at an angle that mimics the downward direction of the natural light. For example a nose looks most like a 3D real nose in a 2D photo when the key light is placed 45 to the side of it and 45 above the eye line. Try that and you'll see what I mean.

So if your subject is average height (5.5 ft) and you want natural lighting from a flash placed 4ft from the nose to get that flattering natural 3D modeling 45 downward angle you'll either need a stand in the 8ft range for the key light. For wider crops as you move the flash further away to keep it out of the shot the flash will need to be raised higher to maintain that same 45 angle and flattering natural modeling. So notwithstanding weight concerns a 12' stand is the best all round choice for key light.

Fill placement is different. Ideally I want my fill to cast no shadows seen by the camera. Think about it. If fill is casting a shadows is there any fill in the shadow it casts? Only what is bouncing off the walls or coming from the sky. The net result is that unless fill is kept center around lens / chin level you'll get a splotchy pattern of shadows, lighter where the fill light hits, darker (sometimes inky black) where it doesn't.

Outdoors you need to have people look up so the brow doesn't shade skylight (many don't realize this) then raise the camera off ground level to look down. I bring a step ladder and stand about 8-9' off the ground and place my fill below and directly in front of me winding up about level with the upraised tip of the nose creating even shadowless (from camera view) fill. If you fill that way a shorter 7'-8' stand will work fine for the fill. Sometimes I just clamp the the fill light to the ladder with a super clamp. In the studio when using butterfly (key and fill centered) I just clamp the fill light to the same 12' stand that is holding the key light..







Super clamps (show with 6" extension arms) are very handy...






A ladder might seem a PITA to carry, but mine double as a "tripod" ...






I took a 30 cent 1/4"-20 1" long bolt and counter-sunk it to a board (painted black for that "pro" look) I "A" clamp to the ladder. I then just screw on the ball head from the tripod. I also have a 1/4-20 thread 5/8" light stand stud and can use the same board to mount a light. I haven't gotten around to it yet but could just attach similar studs to the ladder for light attachment points...

A 5/8" light stud on a board and a bungie cord can turn any nearby tree or post into a light stand which is easier than hauling sand around. Another alternative to sand is to stake the lights down. One of the corkscrew anchors for a dog under the stand and a bungie or rope with a bowline and a tent hitch will keep in in place.









Nov 23, 2011 at 02:53 PM
Micky Bill
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p.1 #9 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


I have a friend who has a few stands that he found to be too lightweight. He disassembled the lower section and filled it with BBs or lead shot. It give a lot more stability without the need for a sandbag, which is sometimes hard to use with a small stand.


Nov 23, 2011 at 06:08 PM
 

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Mark_L
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p.1 #10 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


For 2.3kg of flash head you really want the manfrotto 1005 which is an excellent stand and 2.2kg, I would not go less than this. I have used my Profoto acuteB head (1.8kgish) on the 1052 (the stand up from the nano) but it did not have anywhere near the rigidity especially with a modifier.

What are you shooting where 6' of height is enough?



Nov 23, 2011 at 06:15 PM
igmolinav
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p.1 #11 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Hi,

Thank you for your answers : ) !!!
It is very kind of all of you!

Kind regards,

igmolinav



Nov 23, 2011 at 09:17 PM
ukphotographer
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p.1 #12 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Fully extended a Nano is 7'2", add on a swivel adapter and a flash head and this comes to about 7'10" which is adequate for most situations. They must take the height measurement when the legs are flat on the floor ?

At full extension I wouldn't really want to start loading the stand with any kind of off centre weight as they can pretty soon resemble those spinning plate poles! However, since they're designed for small packed size and low weight they do an amicable job.

I use several of these and each fits in the case with the lighting - mainly Quantum and Lumedynes - these have low head weights and power pack ballasts so are particularly suited to these stands as not all the weight is on the spigot. I use an 80x100 softbox OK with these, but even these are shallow keeping the weight more centred. It's the 'fitting in the case with the lighting' which is the problem with stands if you need to use them on location and especially with the minimum closed length.

There is a definate lack of decent, small, packable light stands. Theres plenty of long light stands of 3 or 4 section lengths, but the cases to accomodate these as well as lighting do become rather unwieldy.

You will notice too that small, packable high stands demand a higher premium than their equivalent height longer packed size cousins, so unless packed size is critical, the longer stands would probably be the better option.

The Mathews reverse looks interesting, and at 20" would fit in a 1610 Pelican case I use, but it has cam-locks. My experience with cam-locks, especially on compact stands is that they slip and need tightening regularly for the cam to maintain enough pressure to lock the stand. I'd avoid plastic locks too.




Nov 24, 2011 at 01:20 AM
400d
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p.1 #13 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


Roland W wrote:
One stand that might work out for you is the "Matthews Reverse Stand". I find it is has a good load capacity at 11 pounds and still stores reasonably well at 23 inches. The stand is generally built very well compared to a lot of small stands, and the legs can be set almost flat with the ground to allow the use of sandbags out on the legs. Load ratings are not really standarized, but I agree with the Matthews rating, and would recomend that you get this or something else with a similar rating to support the load
...Show more
The Matthews looks like Lowel's as well. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/284734-REG/Lowel_UN_55_Uni_TO_Light_Stand.html



Nov 24, 2011 at 01:37 AM
kenyee
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p.1 #14 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


400d wrote:
The Matthews looks like Lowel's as well. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/284734-REG/Lowel_UN_55_Uni_TO_Light_Stand.html


FWIW, I like the Lowel UN55...the Matthews MERF looks sturdier though, so I might have gotten that instead if I made the choice now.
I've put a bee on the UN55 but wouldn't extend it too high and I'd sandbag it. It's really meant as a speedlight stand that can hold an umbrella...it's better than the Strobist Manfrotto Nano stands IMHO...



Nov 24, 2011 at 01:52 AM
Roland W
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p.1 #15 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


For the Matthews Reverse models of stands, there are two versions, the original one that is just called a "Reverse" stand, and the newer and some what smaller one, called a "MERF Reverse" stand. The original is rated for more load, and it's collapsed length is 23 inches rather than the 20 inches for the MERF version. My experience mentioned in a post above is only for the original version, and I stand by it being a stand well worthy of its 11 pound load rating. The MERF version also sounds interesting, but I have never seen one.

I also would like to mention that I replaced my previous Lowel UN-55 stands with the Matthews Reverse stands because I wanted better load handling, an I got it. The Lowel stand is fairly nice, but it is only rated for 3 pounds. The Matthews Reverse stand has stronger legs, a better center column, and much better column clamps. And the Matthews also costs almost exactly the same as the Lowel, so to me the Matthews was a no brainer once I discovered it.



Nov 24, 2011 at 04:15 AM
ukphotographer
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p.1 #16 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


If packed size is an important factor then you need to buy the longest folded size that fits your case. Nano 19", Mathews MERF 20", Lowel Uni-TO 21.5", 'Original' Mathews Reverse 22.75". Each stand size increases in weight but none will be as sturdy as a proper decent stand of a 3 tube design. It all depends on which way you need to compromise.


Nov 24, 2011 at 06:10 PM
Yasmin
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p.1 #17 · Stand - Is there a way to make it withstand more weight?


@cgardner

Book Worthy.



Nov 24, 2011 at 06:44 PM





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