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Archive 2011 · Monitor Brightness?
randy_lv
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Monitor Brightness?


Hi,

I bought a monitor calibration device and it really helped the colors and tone of my m
Images when I print them. The device does not calibrate the brightness of t
My LCD monitor. My pictures look dark sometimes when get the printed.

Any ways to adjust or calibrate the brightness of my monitor,should I try to get it to match the LCD on my camera or just pump it up until the prints look good?

Thanks,

Randy



Nov 18, 2011 at 05:44 AM
EB-1
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Monitor Brightness?


You have to set the brightness on the monitor close to what you want. I use 100 cd/m2, but you may prefer 120 depending on the ambient light in the room. The software should allow you to see the effect of changing the brightness. What system are you using for calibration? If the prints are significantly too dakr or light compared to that then there may be an issue with the printer profile or settings. Normally it is not a good idea to change the monitor to matched a funky printer setting.

EBH



Nov 18, 2011 at 05:52 AM
EVO088
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Monitor Brightness?


best way to match brightness is match it to your prints!


Nov 18, 2011 at 04:47 PM
RHPS
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Monitor Brightness?


Try this http://www.hermitage-ps.co.uk/monitor_luminance.htm


Nov 18, 2011 at 05:48 PM
howardm4
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Monitor Brightness?


as noted, blindly setting your calibration brightness to some value (recommended or otherwise) isn't going to work. Most recommendations of 120-140 are too high for most home viewing situations. I think I have mine calibrated to 90.

google this: 'luminous landscape prints too dark'



Nov 18, 2011 at 08:40 PM
 

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randy_lv
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Monitor Brightness?


Thank you for the tips. I am using a Spyder 3 express device.


Nov 19, 2011 at 06:33 AM
mikek200
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Monitor Brightness?


Had a similar problem recently..
I found this article very helpful:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/why_are_my_prints_too_dark.shtml

Hope this helps,
Mike



Nov 19, 2011 at 07:54 AM
EB-1
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Monitor Brightness?


That is a great article for getting started. Rather than making the entire room very bright and having that compete with the monitor all the time, I have a good light over the printer area.

EBH



Nov 19, 2011 at 01:57 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Monitor Brightness?


+1 @ EBH & RHPS

RHPS wrote:
Try this http://www.hermitage-ps.co.uk/monitor_luminance.htm


While the article didn't specify the difference between additive and subtractive ... it brought the difference to light (pun intended) for me on this one.

It donned on me that while prior thinking was that by getting your monitor brightness calibrated for the room's luminance level, you should be able to get your prints to match. RATHER, because the monitor is additive and the print is subtractive ... with the room level being constant ... they CANNOT match and NEVER will using the SAME (low) AMBIENT luminance levels for viewing each (particularly with our adaptive vision).

Thinking back to the use of a light box for chromes and dedicated picture lights mounted above the print/painting on the wall. Now, it makes sense why the angst exists, i.e. the print is absorbing photons, whereas the monitor is making them. It's no different than looking at the sunset (additive) vs. looking at a different subject (subtractive) being illuminated by the SAME overhead sky that exists along with the sunset ... i.e. two very different luminance values.

Crude, but conceptually it's no longer like chasing a ghost for me ... "Got It" ... Thanks.

Let:
X=Monitor Brightness
Y=Ambient
Z=Reflected Print

If
X>Y (Emitted vs. Ambient)
Y>Z (Product of Absorption)

Then
X>Y>Z
X>Z
Z<X

Bottom line for me on this one is: Understand the need to put the right amount of light on your print to offset the absorption characteristic of the printed media (which varies from rag to metallic anyway).



Nov 19, 2011 at 02:55 PM





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